OMAHA (AP) — The economy in nine Midwestern and Plains states was hampered in part by tariffs and flooding last month, but it should continue to grow over the next three to six months, according to a report released Monday.

The Mid-America Business Conditions Index rose to 55.4 in June, from 54.3 in May, the report said. The April figure was 55.9.

“Weak farm income, produced partially by tariffs and flooding , pulled regional growth below that of the nation,” said Creighton University economist Ernie Goss, who oversees the survey. “Even so, based on our manufacturing survey over the past several months, I expect overall growth to remain solidly positive.”

The results from the survey of supply managers were compiled into a collection of indexes ranging from zero to 100. Survey organizers say any score above 50 suggests growth. A score below that suggests decline. The survey covers Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma and South Dakota.

The regional trade numbers for June were down for both exports and imports. The index for new export orders dipped to 48.3, just two-tenths of a point under May’s 48.5, and the import index slumped to 50.0 from May and April’s 57.0.

“Creighton’s survey is beginning to measure growing impacts from tariffs,” Goss said. “June’s import reading is the lowest recorded this year, and June’s export orders index matches January’s low index.”

According to the June survey, however, 71.1 percent of the supply managers who responded supported continuing the tariffs on China or even raising them.

The Business Conditions Index — a measure of economic optimism for the next six months — advanced to 59.1 from May’s 54.5.

“I expect business confidence to depend heavily on trade talks with China and Federal Reserve’s interest rate actions in the weeks and months ahead,” Goss said.

Here are the state-by-state results for June:

Arkansas: The overall index for Arkansas rose last month to 60.1 from May’s 55.9. Index components were new orders at 57.0, production or sales at 58.2, delivery lead time at 60.7, inventories at 61.0 and employment at 63.7.

Iowa: Iowa’s overall index rose above growth neutral in June, hitting 50.4 compared with 47.0 in May. Index components were new orders at 53.5, production or sales at 47.7, delivery lead time at 49.8, employment at 51.0 and inventories at 50.0. Manufacturers in Iowa are experiencing positive gains in economic activity. “U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data (shows) that workers in the state have experienced a solid 3.6% increase in hourly wages over the past 12 months, above the national gain of 3.1% over the same period of time,” he said.

Kansas: The state’s overall index rose last month to a regional high of 62.9 from 55.9 in May. Index components were new orders at 59.2, production or sales at 66.4, delivery lead time at 63.7, employment at 61.1 and inventories at 64.0. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows Kansas workers have experienced a 4.9% gain in hourly wages over the past 12 months, well above the national gain of 3.1% over the same period. Goss also reported gains in economic activity by Iowa manufacturers.

Minnesota: The June overall index for Minnesota fell to 53.4 from 55.0 in May. Index components were new orders at 51.8, production or sales at 51.2, delivery lead time at 56.9, inventories at 53.7 and employment at 53.4. Recent surveys indicate that durable-goods manufacturers are experiencing slight positive gains in economic activity, Goss said. But nondurable-goods producers experienced slightly negative economic conditions in recent months. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows hourly wages have risen 3.4% over the past 12 months, compared with the national gain of 3.1%.

Missouri: Missouri’s overall index climbed to 59.9 from May’s 57.1. Index components were new orders at 63.5, production or sales at 58.0, delivery lead time at 60.5, inventories at 60.8 and employment at 56.9. Missouri manufacturers are reporting solid gains in economic activity, Goss said. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows Missouri workers have experienced a 2.4% gain in hourly wages over the past 12 months, well below the national gain of 3.1%, he said.

Nebraska: Nebraska’s overall index soared above the growth neutral threshold of 50.0 to hit 55.9 in June, compared with 48.9 in May. Index components were new orders at 53.0, production or sales at 52.9, delivery lead time at 55.1, inventories at 55.4 and employment at 58.5. Recent surveys indicate that durable-goods producers experienced slight declines in economic activity, Goss said.

North Dakota: The overall index jumped to 55.0 last month from 49.0 in May. North Dakota’s index components were new orders at 51.6, production or sales at 50.9, delivery lead time at 53.1, employment at 56.6 and inventories at 53.4. Recent surveys show North Dakota manufacturers are experiencing solid gains in economic activity. Goss said U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows that hourly wages have risen 4.7% over the past 12 months, well above the national gain of 3.1%.

Oklahoma: Oklahoma’s overall index also moved above growth neutral 50.0, hitting 54.9 in June, compared with 48.9 in May. Index components were new orders at 53.0, production or sales at 52.8, delivery lead time at 55.1, inventories at 55.3 and employment at 58.4.

South Dakota: The state’s overall index dipped to 54.1 last month from 55.0 in May. Index components were new orders at 53.4, production or sales at 58.9, delivery lead time at 49.2, inventories at 55.9 and employment at 53.3. South Dakota manufacturers reported solid gains in economic activity in recent surveys. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows a 2.4% gain in hourly wages over the past 12 months, well below the national gain of 3.1%. Goss said manufacturers reported economic growth slowed in June.

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